BMW K bikes (Bricks)

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Motorbike Mike

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This fine K is coming with me to Spain for 2 months. If it's enough bike (if you understand me) it'll stay over there for the foreseeable future as there seems to be good K following by the Spanish.



Here's my R1200R that the K may replace. This is a seriously good bike but a change is as good as a rest, they say.



I've had K's for a few years now without problems but wondered if any of you had any advice on what to include in a spares package. There's no point in taking parts I'll not need as I'd like the trailer to be as light as possible. All filters, fluids, brake pads,and tyres are fresh.

I've made a start, 2 fuel pumps...... . . .

    

Point-Seven-five

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I carry a clutch cable, headlight bulb, tail light bulb, a package each of 7.5 and 15 A. fuses, shifter, brake and clutch levers, fuel pump, and an HES plate. There is also some rags, a set of ball end Allen wrenches, nitrile gloves, a quarter inch drive socket set, electrical tester, a small bottle of engine oil for topping off, spare key, and a print out of ABS fault codes.

My philosophy is that these are the things which can bring a trip to a complete halt, can be changed at the side of the road, and may be difficult, if not impossible, to locate at short notice in a remote location.

I have learned long ago that you will never break anything for which you have a spare close at hand.

I also have a box of more esoteric parts that I may need when on the road. It is all packed and ready to go, and left with someone I can easily reach and trust to send it to me. The contents of this box are only limited by your imagination and mechanical/electrical paranoia. Temperature switch, left and right handlebar switches, rear master cylinder, starter, and some miscellaneous rubber bits like throttle bushings, breather, fuel and coolant hoses.


__________________________________________________
Present:
1994 K75RT
1994 K75S
1992 K100RS

Past:
1982 Honda FT500
1979 Honda XR185
1977 Honda XL125
1974 Honda XL125
1972 OSSA Pioneer 250
1968 Kawasaki 175
    

Motorbike Mike

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@Point-Seven-five wrote:I carry a clutch cable, headlight bulb, tail light bulb, a package each of 7.5 and 15 A. fuses, shifter, brake and clutch levers, fuel pump, and an HES plate. There is also some rags, a set of ball end Allen wrenches, nitrile gloves, a quarter inch drive socket set, electrical tester, a small bottle of engine oil for topping off, spare key, and a print out of ABS fault codes.

My philosophy is that these are the things which can bring a trip to a complete halt, can be changed at the side of the road, and may be difficult, if not impossible, to locate at short notice in a remote location.

I have learned long ago that you will never break anything for which you have a spare close at hand.

I also have a box of more esoteric parts that I may need when on the road. It is all packed and ready to go, and left with someone I can easily reach and trust to send it to me. The contents of this box are only limited by your imagination and mechanical/electrical paranoia. Temperature switch, left and right handlebar switches, rear master cylinder, starter, and some miscellaneous rubber bits like throttle bushings, breather, fuel and coolant hoses.
I'm just about to rifle my K spares and will make sure that I include what you've mentioned....or take a spare bike. Very Happy
Thanks for your advice.

    

Point-Seven-five

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No real need to carry a spare bike. The parts I have listed will fit in the tail cowl along with the tools, especially if you don't have the ABS brain in there. I carry the oil and fuel pump in a pannier(or top case when I use it), and what fits in there goes in the under seat box.


__________________________________________________
Present:
1994 K75RT
1994 K75S
1992 K100RS

Past:
1982 Honda FT500
1979 Honda XR185
1977 Honda XL125
1974 Honda XL125
1972 OSSA Pioneer 250
1968 Kawasaki 175
    

Ringfad

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Whatever you bring you are guaranteed not to use it :-)

The one think I always pack is breakdown insurance.

I have been around Europe quite a lot on k's and have only needed a Rear master cylinder fluid reservoir (Norway), as you may be aware the early k's like yours were prone to these cracking.

Also needed a back brake switch (Italy), I did not like driving without a functioning brake light in Italy !

Temporary repairs were done to get past both these issues.

I do like to use the bikes a lot before trusting them to a long trip.

I also would love to go to Spain for that trip but mightbe a hard tripfrom Ireland at that time of year.

Good luck with the trip.


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;BMW;K100RS Style Black 1987 99K Km ;BMW; K1 Black 1993 42KKm ;BMW;K1100RSRed 1993 50k miles
    

Point-Seven-five

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A large +1 on breakdown insurance. One caveat based on the experience of some riders I know: Don't get breakdown insurance through your vehicle insurance policy. Insurance companies are notoriously slow in paying the folks who come out to rescue you, and as a result they are usually slow to respond to your call.

Rather, go through one of the large auto clubs. Here in the U.S. the best policy is AAA RV Plus. The AAA pays tow operators within a week of billing, and as a result provide members very good emergency service. I have a policy that covers all of my bikes, is good for a 200 mile tow and a week of lodging while repairs are made. I have heard, but can't confirm, that it also covers anyone riding with me. Cost is $35 per year.


__________________________________________________
Present:
1994 K75RT
1994 K75S
1992 K100RS

Past:
1982 Honda FT500
1979 Honda XR185
1977 Honda XL125
1974 Honda XL125
1972 OSSA Pioneer 250
1968 Kawasaki 175
    

Motorbike Mike

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Thanks to .75 I've just been going through all my spares and think I'll start a thread titled "What shit's in your shed?"
If I got hold of an engine I could build another K needing little else. Ebay calls when I get back!
Anyway, I've found a clutch and throttle cable, I'll take 1 coil and a HES...oh and some fuel pipe.



Last edited by Motorbike Mike on Sun Dec 11, 2016 5:42 pm; edited 1 time in total

    

Motorbike Mike

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@Point-Seven-five wrote:A large +1 on breakdown insurance.... I have a policy that covers all of my bikes, is good for a 200 mile tow and a week of lodging while repairs are made. I have heard, but can't confirm, that it also covers anyone riding with me. Cost is $35 per year.
That's great, I'll tell them I'm with you!

    

Point-Seven-five

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That will work for as long as you're buying...


__________________________________________________
Present:
1994 K75RT
1994 K75S
1992 K100RS

Past:
1982 Honda FT500
1979 Honda XR185
1977 Honda XL125
1974 Honda XL125
1972 OSSA Pioneer 250
1968 Kawasaki 175
    

brickrider2

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I don't wish to highjack this thread, as it's an important one. However, I'd like you to expand a bit on your plan to leave the bike in Spain.
This Spring we went to the Iberian Peninsula on holiday for a few weeks. I really was impressed with the roads and scenery, especially in Portugal and Galicia. I'd love to ship a bike there for storage and ride there for longer period of time. Storing a bike in a remote park of the US is simple, as we have loads of rental units for storing anything. I don't recall seeing such facilities in either Spain or Portugal, but I actually didn't think to look for them at the time. Do such facilities exist in either country?

    

Motorbike Mike

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@brickrider2 wrote:I don't wish to highjack this thread, as it's an important one. However, I'd like you to expand a bit on your plan to leave the bike in Spain.
This Spring we went to the Iberian Peninsula on holiday for a few weeks. I really was impressed with the roads and scenery, especially in Portugal and Galicia. I'd love to ship a bike there for storage and ride there for longer period of time. Storing a bike in a remote park of the US is simple, as we have loads of rental units for storing anything. I don't recall seeing such facilities in either Spain or Portugal, but I actually didn't think to look for them at the time. Do such facilities exist in either country?
I don't know about available storage facilities I'm afraid. We're lucky enough have our own place out there and with all that good weather I need a bike to enjoy the sun and scenery.

    

BobT

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If you wanted to store a bike in the south of France then I could probably help. I have my own airstrip about 1 km from my house with a secure hangar. It has to be secure because I keep my aircraft in there!
The only thing that I would ask is that the bike is fully legal and that means registered in the country where is kept, that is European law. A US registered bike cannot be in an EU country for more than 6 months, in fact that also applies to a bike from another EU country.
The offer is there, but I fear the paperwork would be a nightmare if you were to try and import a US spec bike, and it would be difficult for you to visit and then buy a bike here.
There would be no cost to you.
Let me know if I can help.

    

Motorbike Mike

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Puncture outfit. No one mentioned a puncture outfit, anyway I've just come across one in a cupboard so it's in the tail just in case. I'm not sure how good these insertion type repair kits are but we get out into some quite remote area's so it's essential. I think I've got one out there but so far never needed to use it. Fingers crossed.

    

Holister

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I've had a few punctures and use the sticky string plugs. They are dead easy to use, readily available and very reliable. But what I discovered when I repaired a puncture on my daughter's m/c earlier this year, is that over time the string plugs go very gooey in the packet and difficult to insert. So if they're sitting around unused for 12 months in the tail of the bike... where it can get hot, best to throw them out regularly and buy a new packet.

I've always carried a range of spares and tools. What exactly, depends on where and for how long I'm on the road, but I've never had to use any of it.... except for the puncture repair kit.

Don't forget to take something to inflate the tyre. I've been using CO2 canisters which will get you up to about 25psi.


__________________________________________________
1988 K100RT VIN No. 0094680
1989 K100RT VIN No. 0097367 (naked)
1996 K1100RS VIN No. 0451808
Fuel: 95 Octane
Engine Oil:Nulon Full Synthetic 15W50
Gear Box Oil: Nulon Synthetic 75W90
    

Motorbike Mike

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The kit I found has the CO2 canisters and adaptor with it so it is a complete kit. Even if it just got us back to civilisation, that would be fine by me.

    

Point-Seven-five

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I forgot to mention that I carry one of these and a Honda 12v compressor that can inflate to 300 psi on my RT.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/The-Stop-and-Go-Pocket-Tubeless-Tire-Plugger-Pocket-Repair-Kit-1000-0364-0001-/132031061742?hash=item1ebdaa1eee:g:Q6IAAOSwo4pYTO1Z&vxp=mtr

While I have yet to have the opportunity to put one of these plugs in a motorcycle tire, I have driven 20,000+ miles with one in an automobile tire.


__________________________________________________
Present:
1994 K75RT
1994 K75S
1992 K100RS

Past:
1982 Honda FT500
1979 Honda XR185
1977 Honda XL125
1974 Honda XL125
1972 OSSA Pioneer 250
1968 Kawasaki 175
    

92KK 84WW Olaf


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A good thread. There is a huge amount you can do to a K at the roadside and without endless tools.

What fits in the ducktail......? Lots.

Clutch cable BUT also a spare nipple and the sleeve that goes around the nipple.....the nipple falls out if the cable fails at the lever end, a fast happening if the nipple as well as the pivot is not regularly lubricated. A new clutch cable does not come with the nipple or the sleeve and will be useless without the nipple. BMW cable too, not the alternatives.

Spare levers AND gear lever. I have needed the gear lever and brilliant to have it. Also needed the brake lever. The gearlevercan seize on so off with your own one to check it will actually come off on the roadside if needed. Not suspecting you will drop the bike but it's a risk if it rolls or gets knocked off the stand. I have a spares bike and no amount of effort would get the gear lever off it to use as a spare.

Spare fuses and bulbs but these may fit in the electrical box.

Fuel pump will fit in ducktail.

Fuel pipe.

Small amount of wire and electrical connectors [again in the electrical box?].

+1 on the puncture kit, the inserts go funny and seem to have quite a short self life. I have the one with the small cylinders and they work well, mine were used to get others out of trouble.

Make sure the alternator nuts are in good order, but no need to bring spares.

Make sure starter motor can come out......as in allen bolts not seized. Same with bottom of air box, the 2 bolts onto the top of the engine.

If you have an early K [8 valve?] the front and rear brake switches and the clutch switch are the same part. The rear brake one seems the fastest to fail because of its position. I think the side stand electrical switch on later Ks is also the same part no. Spare one of these is useful but more useful really is knowing they can be interchanged easily.

Radiator fan in a known fail issue, make sure its good before you go. Probably wise to add a manual override. However I have now found that this seemingly can use the fan a lot to the point of the bearing or motor failing so keep an eye on it. It will be running in slow traffic in town, even up to 30mph in the heat.

If you plan a lot of riding spare brake pads may be an idea, especially if lots of hills around you. Again they will fit in the ducktail.

Having parts at home ready to send out is the best option too.

Of course you do realise that having all these spares means you wont actually need them.And the one thing that won't be in it is a cold beer.


__________________________________________________
1992 K100LT 0193214 101,000 miles
1984 K100RT 0022575 Baja Red bought 36,000 now 81,400miles
    

Point-Seven-five

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Olaf, you reminded me that I have a set of monkey nutz and a drive dog in my rescue box at home.

I packed the drive dog after I had the splines strip out of the dog on my RT one day on my way home from work. The splines on it are not very deep. It was an odd failure because the nutz were good, and the alternator turned freely with no bearing problems. There was no sign of anything that could make it fail. I have been paranoid about that part ever since because failure kills the charging system

There is more in there, but I can't really recall everything I have in the rescue box since it has been over two years since I packed it.

Touring thousands of miles from home on a 20+ year old bike makes this a fascinating topic for me.



Last edited by Point-Seven-five on Mon Dec 12, 2016 12:15 pm; edited 2 times in total (Reason for editing : fat fingers & awful punctuation)


__________________________________________________
Present:
1994 K75RT
1994 K75S
1992 K100RS

Past:
1982 Honda FT500
1979 Honda XR185
1977 Honda XL125
1974 Honda XL125
1972 OSSA Pioneer 250
1968 Kawasaki 175
    

88

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@92KK 84WW Olaf wrote:
Fuel pipe.

Small amount of wire and electrical connectors [again in the electrical box?].

+1 on the puncture kit, the inserts go funny and seem to have quite a short self life. I have the one with the small cylinders and they work well, mine were used to get others out of trouble.

Having parts at home ready to send out is the best option too.
Top tips....especially the last one. Label them clearly for the benefit of anyone trying to get them to you (or pre-pack them).


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88....May contain nuts!

"The world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page." - St. Augustine from 1600 years ago & still true!

Bike: K100LT 1988. 0172363. AKA the Bullion Brick!
Mods: k1100 screen and stands

K1100rs 1995, Remus exhaust.
    

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