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1Back to top Go down    Motorcycle jack versus Motorcycle lift. on Fri Apr 15, 2011 2:59 pm

robmack

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Hi,

There is a Canadian hardware store chain that is offering a motorcycle jack on-sale at the moment. It looks like this:

The beauty of this jack is the price ($60) and the small size which makes it easy to store when not in use. Would this type of jack hold a K-bike stablely? There are no obvious anchor points which worries me if I needed to do something like a spline lube thta requires removing the rear wheel which would upset the balance of the bike. Oil filter changes would be another problem area I think.

The alternative I would consider would be a ride-on lift, like this:

The concerns I expressed earlier are addressed by this design. However, this takes up lots of floor space and is not easy to stow when not in use.

So, I guess I'm looking for opinions that others might have about a motorcycle lift. What's really important in choosing a lift and what features should I be looking for in a lift?


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Robert
1987 K75 @k75retro.blogspot.ca
2011 Moto Guzzi V7 Racer
http://k75retro.blogspot.ca/
    

ReneZ

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I'm quite sure you could use the first part safely if you would fabricate some angled profiles that would bolt onto the bike where the normal BMW frame goes and also onto the two cross bars of the jack. If you look at some of the BMW books they use a similar construction.


__________________________________________________
Greetings from Florida! Having a 'new' K  :cyclops:    Surprised-o: 

Rene


BMW K100 - 1985 (0030029)
BMW K1200GT - 2003 (ZK01223)
    

K-BIKE


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The two serve different purposes, the lift raises the bike to enable one to work on the bike whilst standing and to enable one to say drain the oil whilst bending, not laid on the floor. The jack raises both wheels clear of the ground. The cost of a proper professional grade lift is probably ten times that of the jack and will you use it enough to justify that? The jack will still be useful for the times you want both wheels off the ground. I bought the jack and it works well and takes up very little room whereas the lift takes up a lot of space.
Regards,
K-BIKE



Last edited by K-BIKE on Sat Apr 16, 2011 6:45 pm; edited 1 time in total

    

Crazy Frog

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I own the Canadian Tire lift and I have mix feeling about is.
As the K bike doesn't have a sub frame, you have to lift under the engine. The lift being too much forward, the front wheel will stay on the ground.
You have to strap the bike on the lift and when in the air, it's not really stable.
Mine has folding legs that can be deployed on the side, but even with this it's quite tippy.

CF


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1986 k75, 1985 K100rt, 1985 K100rt/EML sidecar.
    

Avenger GT

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I use a lift, bought second hand (hardly used) 2 years ago, and wonder how I ever managed without one. No more kneeling down or even lying on the floor to get under a bike. Storage is not a big issue as I can turn it up on edge against a wall, or even in the middle of the floor with a few bits of 4x2 stuck under it to keep it standing.

    

club_c

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I also have a version of the CT lift and agree with Bert's comments. I'm looking for a table lift that's reasonably priced now. And would sell the jack.

    

robmack

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Well, I'm passing on the CTC jack and waiting for Princess Auto to put one of their lifts on sale. It's not hugely different in price between the jack and the lift ($400 normal price versus $60 sale price) but for the piece of mind for keeping the bike secure while lifted and for the nice worksurface the lift offers, I think the difference in price is justified. When PS puts the lifts on sale, they take off about $100, so it's just to wait and see. Thanks for the input, guys.


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Robert
1987 K75 @k75retro.blogspot.ca
2011 Moto Guzzi V7 Racer
http://k75retro.blogspot.ca/
    

Albyalbatross1

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I built my own lift table from the plans found here I made mine wider to accomodate tools and parts as to keep everything together. It stores on its side or if I am lazy I will just park my ute right over it.

    

blaKey

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Wow! Brilliant!
Paint it red, put a BMW sticker on it and I'd buy one! Seriously!


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Neil
K100RS 1986 RED!
K100RT 1987 (now nekkid with red bits)

Remember Rule No. 6
    

10Back to top Go down    Re: Motorcycle jack versus Motorcycle lift. on Sun Apr 17, 2011 12:52 am

robmack

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@Albyalbatross1 wrote:I built my own lift table from the plans found here
Very nice lift! And all DIY too. I'd like to go that route if I had access to metal, welding equipment and welding skills but nix on all fronts. So, in the end, I'm probably going to purchase ready-made.


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Robert
1987 K75 @k75retro.blogspot.ca
2011 Moto Guzzi V7 Racer
http://k75retro.blogspot.ca/
    

Ajays

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http://www.motorbikebits.co.uk/proddetail.php?prod=PROD0003

I have this one and mine was a lot more expensive than the one you show robmack....click the link to see mine.

The lift is 15 inches and it will take the K100. There are strap loops for holding it down and you can manouvere it around. You need to remove the belly pan of course.
Ajays

I am looking for a good puncture Kit any ideas?

    

blaKey

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Ajays, BITE ME! Very Happy

I hope this helps.



Last edited by blakey on Sun Apr 17, 2011 6:39 pm; edited 1 time in total


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Neil
K100RS 1986 RED!
K100RT 1987 (now nekkid with red bits)

Remember Rule No. 6
    

charlie99

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nice one alby ........


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cheezy grin whilst riding, kinda bloke ....oh the joy !!!! ...... ( brick aviator )

'86 K100 RT..#0090401 ..."Gerty" ( Gertrude Von Clickandshift ) --------O%O
    

14Back to top Go down    Re: Motorcycle jack versus Motorcycle lift. on Sun Apr 17, 2011 10:48 am

Ajays

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Blakey,
The puncture kit was for the bike pictured....! Joke Mate.
Ajays


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AJAYS
    

BIG D

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Cool

Crikey Ajays, thats a corker.

BIG D

    

blaKey

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SUCKED IN! Embarassed

Good one Ajays!

You've been taken off my Christmas Card list...


__________________________________________________
Neil
K100RS 1986 RED!
K100RT 1987 (now nekkid with red bits)

Remember Rule No. 6
    

Crazy Frog

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If you are like me and have to move one bike to gain access to the other, here is another interesting lifting device.
I once bought this trolley where you ride the bike on but found it was pretty difficult to use as the bike being higher you have a hard time to put your feet on the ground. (I dropped the K100 when trying to take it off the trolley).



Telefix has a small trolley perfectly adapted for the K100. This device is quite expensive (£183.33) but I believe that it should be very easy to make something similar for 1/2 of the price. (it may not be shinny, but cheaper).




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1986 k75, 1985 K100rt, 1985 K100rt/EML sidecar.
    

Albyalbatross1

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Has anyone got access to one of these ? If I could get some pics from each side of the screw and how it is coupled I should be able to knock up something for a table lift to keep the height down and to help with (almost dropping Ks) being a lot more secure than hydrualic jack.



Last edited by Albyalbatross1 on Sat Apr 23, 2011 6:27 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : Got it wrong)

    

ReneZ

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I have one of the cruiser 'lift' thingies as above. Works like a charm if you want to lift the front or the rear as our engines have this flat bottom. It is quite stable as well. I'm looking at making two ears to it so I can bolt it to the pan where normally the lower fairing or the official BMW lift fits. It doesn't bring the bike up like a proper table lift, but is very (!) handy to replace a jack.


__________________________________________________
Greetings from Florida! Having a 'new' K  :cyclops:    Surprised-o: 

Rene


BMW K100 - 1985 (0030029)
BMW K1200GT - 2003 (ZK01223)
    

robmack

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@Crazy Frog wrote:I own the Canadian Tire lift and I have mix feeling about it.
As the K bike doesn't have a sub frame, you have to lift under the engine. The lift being too much forward, the front wheel will stay on the ground.
You have to strap the bike on the lift and when in the air, it's not really stable.
Mine has folding legs that can be deployed on the side, but even with this it's quite tippy.

CF
I purchased the CT motorcycle jack used from a private seller for $40 afterall. I needed a jack or lift to do the work on my engine.

Bert was right; the bike is very tippy when being lifted and also front heavy because the balance is upset.

I solved the instability by putting a couple of outriggers on the oil sump (as suggested by ReneZ in the srcond post). These outriggers are simply 2" angle iron, 14" long. I drilled 8.5mm holes to accomodate short M8 cap screws which bolt onto the oil pan.


I thought that I'd drill holes in the end of the angle iron and tap holes in the jack lifting arms. That would give me a means to bolt the engine to the jack, ensuring that the motorcycle would not be tipping over at all. An added benefit I thought would be the ability to bolt the engine to the work bench if necessary. I could locate four threaded inserts in the bench top and use the same cap screws to secure the engine.

When I finally did get around to lifting the bike, I found that the outriggers were sufficient to hold it securely. I've been working on the engine in this manner for a little while now and think the solution I came up with is good enough. Thanks ReneZ.



Last edited by robmack on Sun Jul 03, 2011 9:32 pm; edited 1 time in total


__________________________________________________
Robert
1987 K75 @k75retro.blogspot.ca
2011 Moto Guzzi V7 Racer
http://k75retro.blogspot.ca/
    

charlie99

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good thinking rob ....loooks really stable


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cheezy grin whilst riding, kinda bloke ....oh the joy !!!! ...... ( brick aviator )

'86 K100 RT..#0090401 ..."Gerty" ( Gertrude Von Clickandshift ) --------O%O
    

K-BIKE


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Excellent idea,
Regards,
K-BIKE

    

ReneZ

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Ah, good one, love it when it works. For quick jobs I use a 'cruiser stand' like this one.


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Greetings from Florida! Having a 'new' K  :cyclops:    Surprised-o: 

Rene


BMW K100 - 1985 (0030029)
BMW K1200GT - 2003 (ZK01223)
    

Albyalbatross1

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I like it!! Simple solutions..

    

robmack

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Thanks, guys.

By the way, I just found out that Carquest leases all sorts of automotive tools -- including lifts. For $40 per year ($80 for a 24 month term), you can lease a motorcycle/ATV lift from them.

That's a great option for those who don't want to buy a lift or don't have the skills/tools to build a lift. Like a leased vehicle, you could get the latest and greatest lift after the term is up. Hmmmm....


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Robert
1987 K75 @k75retro.blogspot.ca
2011 Moto Guzzi V7 Racer
http://k75retro.blogspot.ca/
    

robmack

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Doing my regular Kijiji searching, I found an air-powered motorcycle lift for sale locally. I called up the seller and went over to take a look. It was perfect for my needs. I had been eyeing a Easy-Rizer lift for several weeks now and even went as far as to design my own and priced out the metal (because the lift is not available in Canada). I didn't want to think how much it would cost to get someone to weld this up. This air-lift lift was better than my design, able to lift 2500 pounds, has automatic pilar locks and was cheaper than the raw metal costs to make my own lift. So I bought it.



The air coupling is right where the handles are. Injecting air lifts the entire pilar along with the arm. When the desired height is attained, you release the air and an automatic pilar locking caul secures the pilar in place. When it's time to lower the mechanism, there is a release handle that disengages the caul lock and the pilar lowers.

Now, I'll just have to design mounting plates to fit my bikes.


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Robert
1987 K75 @k75retro.blogspot.ca
2011 Moto Guzzi V7 Racer
http://k75retro.blogspot.ca/
    

27Back to top Go down    Re: Motorcycle jack versus Motorcycle lift. on Sun Nov 11, 2012 10:47 am

Crazy Frog

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Rob,

I just put my K100 on the bike lift, and it's not very stable.
I found your post about the 2" angle iron bolted on the engine and this is cleaver :BW: .
It's Nov 11 and all the stores are closed. I am trying to find a friend with 3ft of material to install it on my engine block.

I will take your idea further..... I am thinking of permanently screwing 2 shorter pieces of angle iron to bolt a piece of thick aluminum plate to protect the bottom of the engine.
With the 15" wheels on the rig, the engine is a lot closer to the ground.

This can be good for any bike Very Happy .

CF


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1986 k75, 1985 K100rt, 1985 K100rt/EML sidecar.
    

Themason

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@Crazy Frog wrote:I own the Canadian Tire lift and I have mix feeling about it.
As the K bike doesn't have a sub frame, you have to lift under the engine. The lift being too much forward, the front wheel will stay on the ground.
You have to strap the bike on the lift and when in the air, it's not really stable.
Mine has folding legs that can be deployed on the side, but even with this it's quite tippy.

CF

@robmack wrote:
I purchased the CT motorcycle jack used from a private seller for $40 afterall. I needed a jack or lift to do the work on my engine.

Bert was right; the bike is very tippy when being lifted and also front heavy because the balance is upset.

I solved the instability by putting a couple of outriggers on the oil sump (as suggested by ReneZ in the srcond post). These outriggers are simply 2" angle iron, 14" long. I drilled 8.5mm holes to accomodate short M8 cap screws which bolt onto the oil pan.


I thought that I'd drill holes in the end of the angle iron and tap holes in the jack lifting arms. That would give me a means to bolt the engine to the jack, ensuring that the motorcycle would not be tipping over at all. An added benefit I thought would be the ability to bolt the engine to the work bench if necessary. I could locate four threaded inserts in the bench top and use the same cap screws to secure the engine.

When I finally did get around to lifting the bike, I found that the outriggers were sufficient to hold it securely. I've been working on the engine in this manner for a little while now and think the solution I came up with is good enough. Thanks ReneZ.



Brilliant! I have a lift like yours from Sears Roebuck (made in China, probably the exact same lift as yours with different decals on it) that I bought to use when servicing my V-Rod but I have also use it with a heavy steel plate across the lifting arms to carry my K bike engine, after which I have to strap the bike securely to the lift. I use this lift on the K bike only for spline lubes. For the V-Rod with it's large and widely spaced frame rails it is very stable.


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I live in a parallel universe but have a vacation home in reality :arrow:

1984 K-100RS Alaska Blue w/Parelever and 16V wheels.

1984 K-100RS Metallic Madison stock

1986 R-80G/S w/1000 cc engine

2007 Harley Davidson Street Rod Mirage Orange w/XR1200 wheels, Race Tech, True Track, Works Performance shocks

2007 Harley Davidson Street Rod Vivid Black stock

1993-ish K-100/1100RT/LT hemaphrodite frankenbike thingy to be painted satin black from a rattle can eventually
    

Crazy Frog

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Today I installed the angle iron on the sump, but it didnt go as easy as drilling 2 holes.
The protuberance of the oil filter was interfering.
I could have installed spacers on the back of the angle iron, but it would interfere with the chair sub frame. The solution was to make a cut on the angle iron.



The weather was too nice and i preferred to go for a ride. I left it with a piece of shingle under one side but will fix that before working on the bike.

The bike is almost balanced with a bit more weight on the front wheel. The back one is off the ground by maybe 2 inches. With a couple of extra straps, I could lift the bike straight up

Robmack, your are a genius!
This was easy and it`s efficient.

CF


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1986 k75, 1985 K100rt, 1985 K100rt/EML sidecar.
    

30Back to top Go down    Re: Motorcycle jack versus Motorcycle lift. on Tue Nov 13, 2012 12:46 am

robmack

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@Crazy Frog wrote:Today I installed the angle iron on the sump, but it didnt go as easy as drilling 2 holes.
The protuberance of the oil filter was interfering.
I could have installed spacers on the back of the angle iron, but it would interfere with the chair sub frame. The solution was to make a cut on the angle iron.
Glad it worked out for you, Bert.

You're right about the spacers on the exhaust side. I didn't make mention of the spacers; my oversight. What I did was to clamp oversized M10 nuts on the back side of the angle iron (using the bolt to keep alignment with the drilled hole) and silver soldered them in place, making them permanent fixtures on the angle iron. Your solution with the cutout is just as good.


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Robert
1987 K75 @k75retro.blogspot.ca
2011 Moto Guzzi V7 Racer
http://k75retro.blogspot.ca/
    

robmack

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@Crazy Frog wrote:I will take your idea further..... I am thinking of permanently screwing 2 shorter pieces of angle iron to bolt a piece of thick aluminum plate to protect the bottom of the engine.
An update to my air lift I described above.

I finally found the time to get the air-powered lift modified for my bikes.  I designed a base plate and two adapter plates, one for my K-bikes and another for my Moto Guzzi.  For the K-bikes, I used CF's idea and had the shop weld four angle iron tabs onto a 1/4" steel adapter plate.  I had the shop weld a large 1/4" steel base plate onto the arms of the lift.  

These tabs had holes that lined up with those in the oil pan.  I use M8 x 15 bolts to fasten the plate to the oil pan.  I had prepared several strategically placed tapped holes on the base plate that corresponded with holes in the adapter plate(s). These holes are for hand screws that secure the adapter plates to the base plate.  I use a wooden shim to support the bike under the center stand.

This is how it looks in action:





Whenever I want to lift the Moto Guzzi, I'd just change the adapter plate and fasten the bike to the lift.  This is very secure.  The lift locks at several points in its travel so that it won't accidently drop.  The bike is securely bolted to the lift arm and I have full access from any side.  The lift can raise the bike almost to the ceiling of the garage and it has wheels to allow it to be moved about the garage.


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Robert
1987 K75 @k75retro.blogspot.ca
2011 Moto Guzzi V7 Racer
http://k75retro.blogspot.ca/
    

1990k75

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Wish I had read this thread last week... Sad 

Bought the Crappy Tire lift & spent 2 days messing with it - always seemed the bike was back heavy, so I used 2x12 wood & ect, plus ratchet strap over the forks...

Thought I was good, got bike up a foot - then it collapsed on me...  Crying or Very sad 

Got bike up without breaking any bones, but did f*ck up some of the fairing... Embarassed 

Now I have fairing repairs to do, & no source of matching paint...  Crying or Very sad 

Not sure I understand the angle iron mods, do I have to drill into the bike?  😕 

Wife Joanie is very understanding, but $800 - $1000 for a 'real' lift? -hmm

Guess I'm just glad I didn't break a leg...   Very Happy

    

robmack

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You don't drill holes in the motorcycle; you bolt into the threaded holes that are on the block which are placed there for the lower fairing pan.  The holes are drilled into the angle iron to line up with the threaded holes in the block, and screws are used to fasten the irons onto the block.  This provides your stable platform.

To bad you're in Quebec and not near Toronto.  I have the original irons in the basement not being used you can have.


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Robert
1987 K75 @k75retro.blogspot.ca
2011 Moto Guzzi V7 Racer
http://k75retro.blogspot.ca/
    

34Back to top Go down    Re: Motorcycle jack versus Motorcycle lift. on Thu Nov 12, 2015 10:14 am

Point-Seven-five

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@1990k75 wrote:Wish I had read this thread last week... Sad 

Now I have fairing repairs to do, & no source of matching paint...  Crying or Very sad 

Try these guys, I have bought Mystic Red from them that is a perfect match. 

http://www.cyclecolor.com/wwwroot/order_paint_here.htm#TUCC

Don't bother with their clear coat.  You can get that in rattle cans locally, or do like I do and take the parts with the base coat on them to a collision shop for the clear coat.  They can shoot your parts when they are doing a car with the left over clear.  I have had both lower panels for an RT fairing clear coated this way for $25.

If they won't ship to you, I could order for you and have them ship to me in New York.  I will be ordering some paint for my K75S in a few weeks.  I can then mail from Niagara Falls, ON and avoid the customs hassle.


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Present:
1994 K75RT
1994 K75S
1992 K100RS

Past:
1982 Honda FT500
1979 Honda XR185
1977 Honda XL125
1974 Honda XL125
1972 OSSA Pioneer 250
1968 Kawasaki 175
    

35Back to top Go down    Re: Motorcycle jack versus Motorcycle lift. on Fri Nov 13, 2015 12:01 am

1990k75

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@robmack wrote:You don't drill holes in the motorcycle; you bolt into the threaded holes that are on the block which are placed there for the lower fairing pan.  The holes are drilled into the angle iron to line up with the threaded holes in the block, and screws are used to fasten the irons onto the block.  This provides your stable platform.

To bad you're in Quebec and not near Toronto.  I have the original irons in the basement not being used you can have.

Thanks for the generous offer - with shipping costs as they are...  Twisted Evil

I've got a drill press & a handy local welding shop to source angle iron, so should be OK

    

36Back to top Go down    Re: Motorcycle jack versus Motorcycle lift. on Fri Nov 13, 2015 12:57 am

1990k75

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Hey Point-Seven-Five...

Very nice of you to offer to smuggle for me  Wink  because they clearly state US orders only... Sad 

We get this all the time, from some who can't be bothered with the paperwork - to those who can't legally ship flammable (gee, like paint!) or terrorist-type raw materials.

I'll hustle out to the garage & check paint colour (or color as spellcheck has just reminded me it is in USA) & get back to you.

Don't think (sometimes I do this...) I'll publish my CC# here Laughing but I can PM it to you.
Scary prices for big cans! If you just want the 2oz touch-up I'll pay for yours too.

Lorne & Joanie

    

1990k75

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Me again - guess what? - we have more in common than our age Laughing 

Mystic Red #689 it is. How many gallons you ordering? LOL

But seriously... do you know if the 2oz can be sprayed without dilution? I suppose they would insist on using their dilutant...

I suppose we should continue this via PM so as not to bore other readers...

Cheers Lorne & Joanie cheers

    

1990k75

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@Crazy Frog wrote:Today I installed the angle iron on the sump, but it didnt go as easy as drilling 2 holes.
The protuberance of the oil filter was interfering.
I could have installed spacers on the back of the angle iron, but it would interfere with the chair sub frame. The solution was to make a cut on the angle iron.



The weather was too nice and i preferred to go for a ride. I left it with a piece of shingle under one side but will fix that before working on the bike.

The bike is almost balanced with a bit more weight on the front wheel. The back one is off the ground by maybe 2 inches. With a couple of extra straps, I could lift the bike straight up

Robmack, your are a genius!
This was easy and it`s efficient.

CF

I did the spacer route also... I notice in all the pics posted by others that the engine is semi-naked. I'll tell you it's not an easy task to get a bolt into the left rear - seems to be an annoying exhaust pipe in  the way, not helped by arthritic fingers & MY DAMN GLASSES keep slipping off my nose   Mad  Got it done though Cool

Now if the guy on KIJIJI with the $40 lift would answer his phone...

    

robmack

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What I ended up doing for the spacers on the left side was to silver solder nuts to the angle iron. I took M10 nuts and fastened them with bolts to the angle iron. I then silver soldered them in place, removed the fastening bolts, and then cleaned the holes with an M8 clearance sized drill.

Agreed. Getting that last bolt in place on the rear left is difficult. I needed a ratchet with an extension and U-joint adapter to work past the pipe.


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Robert
1987 K75 @k75retro.blogspot.ca
2011 Moto Guzzi V7 Racer
http://k75retro.blogspot.ca/
    

1990k75

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On the K75, pipe #3 is right in front of the left rear attachment point, with no room for a socket.... Rolling Eyes

    

1990k75

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Point-Seven-five came through for me, got the paint in the mail yesterday Very Happy 

Let's all give a round of applause for a fellow member helping out 


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Past bikes - Yamaha YL-1, Honda XL-125, 1967 BSA 650 Lightning

Current - 1990 K75RT (in drydock) & 1995 K75RT VIN # (I'll get back with that)

Who sez I'm too old to ride?
    

RicK G

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Klap Klap Klap Klap Klap Klap Klap Klap Klap Klap Klap Klap


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Bikes 1986 K100RT, 1993 K1100 LT, 1994 K1100 LT, 1993 K75 RT, 1996 K75RT, 1986 K75 GS, 1979 Z1300 Kawasaki X 2 & 1976 SR 500 Yamaha for now
    

blaKey

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+1

Klap, klap, klap etcetera... Very Happy


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Neil
K100RS 1986 RED!
K100RT 1987 (now nekkid with red bits)

Remember Rule No. 6
    

44Back to top Go down    Re: Motorcycle jack versus Motorcycle lift. on Tue Dec 01, 2015 10:43 pm

K75cster

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+2 klapping


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The Clever are adept at extricating themselves from situations that the wise would have avoided from the outset - QUOTE from david Hillel in Out of the Earth.
    

45Back to top Go down    Re: Motorcycle jack versus Motorcycle lift. on Wed Dec 02, 2015 12:10 pm

k-rider

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1990k75

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That is sweet...  Smile


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Past bikes - Yamaha YL-1, Honda XL-125, 1967 BSA 650 Lightning

Current - 1990 K75RT (in drydock) & 1995 K75RT VIN # (I'll get back with that)

Who sez I'm too old to ride?
    

k-rider

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Thank you, and its a great help, but a piece of advice, NEVER EVER forget  to use the strap  Evil or Very Mad

Dont ask  Embarassed


K-rider


Shep

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Silver member
Wow the lift in the floor looks great. As an older rider I struggle to move the bike onto the two different types of lifts I have. I wonder what the cost of jack hammering the floor or cutting the floor is so I can drop my large table lift into a hole.
Wonderful disappearing maintenance table.

Shep


__________________________________________________
Model        Production Date/Serial Number
K100RS      1984 July/ (F0040448)
K100RS      1986 Dec/ (H0142581)
    

k-rider

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Life time member
Life time member
Hi shep 
It didnt cost much, just took a Lot of work, but is worth it
There is at least to major advantages, first :the lift doesnt take up space when not in use, and second :There is No risk when entering the platform, since it is at floor level.

K-rider



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