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1Back to top Go down   Shock absorber stud removal Empty Shock absorber stud removal Fri May 03, 2013 1:35 pm

MT350Explorer

MT350Explorer
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Hi Guys,

I got a new OEM stud from Motorworks today. Can anyone advise the best way to remove the existing, undamaged stud? Is it threadlocked and if so is it with the stuff that needs heat to free it up?

Two nuts on the existing thread and rotate out anticlockwise?

Thanks
Dave


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1991 K100 RS 16 valve
    

2Back to top Go down   Shock absorber stud removal Empty my opinion Fri May 03, 2013 1:57 pm

ibjman

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Others may have a different point of view, but.....
I expect that we assume that the old stud is crystalized so it is not necessary to "save it.
It is possible that the stud is set in red loc-tite. I would heat it regardless, with a torch used "Gently".......heating the stud itself, not the housing, thus saving the finish on the aluminum. Loctite starts to melt at about 400 dg. F. so it doesn't require a lot of heat.
I generally use the biggest pair of vice grips I can find to latch on to the stud & turn it.
Sometimes more force can be achieved than with the 2 nut method.
We really don't need to worry about damaging the old stud.
You could try the 2 nut method first, I doubt if you'll find that it's very tight. Should come out fairly easily.
Good luck

    

3Back to top Go down   Shock absorber stud removal Empty Re: Shock absorber stud removal Fri May 03, 2013 3:04 pm

Crazy Frog

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@ibjman wrote:I would heat it regardless, with a torch used "Gently".......heating the stud itself, not the housing, thus saving the finish on the aluminum. Loctite starts to melt at about 400 dg. F. so it doesn't require a lot of heat.

Apart from softening the old Loctite, the purpose of heating the assembly is to expand the thread to free up the stud.

In Theory, you should heat the aluminum to expand the diameter of the threaded hole and try to keep the stud as cold as possible. If the stud is stocked, give it a good blow with a hammer (Put the 2 nuts on in order to protect the thread).



CF


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Shock absorber stud removal Frog15Shock absorber stud removal Logo2101986 k75, 1985 K100rt, 1985 K100rt/EML GT2 sidecar, 1999 K1200lt/Hannigan Astro Sport sidecar.
    

4Back to top Go down   Shock absorber stud removal Empty Re: Shock absorber stud removal Fri May 03, 2013 3:49 pm

walfish

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+1
@Crazy Frog wrote:
In Theory, you should heat the aluminum to expand the diameter of the threaded hole and try to keep the stud as cold as possible. If the stud is stocked, give it a good blow with a hammer (Put the 2 nuts on in order to protect the thread).

CF


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Shock absorber stud removal Uk-log10 88 K 100  0033026 
   
                            92 K 1100 LT  6455097
    

5Back to top Go down   Shock absorber stud removal Empty Hmmm Fri May 03, 2013 5:43 pm

ibjman

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OK, I advised against torching on the housing in this case because many are coated or painted.
I expect he'll have little trouble if any getting this out

    

6Back to top Go down   Shock absorber stud removal Empty Re: Shock absorber stud removal Fri May 03, 2013 5:46 pm

the.postman

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I know they are a bit expensive but a good set of "twist sockets" are handy for not only stud removal but they can also grip the head of allen bolts, and the dreaded rounded off bolt/nut

Shock absorber stud removal Twist_10


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1985 K100 RS   104EA49840092        #0081788     SILVERish (Madison) Prod. date 05/12/84
1984 srx 600
1986 cbr1000f/h
    

7Back to top Go down   Shock absorber stud removal Empty Re: Shock absorber stud removal Fri May 03, 2013 8:27 pm

Crazy Frog

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@ibjman wrote:OK, I advised against torching on the housing in this case because many are coated or painted.
I expect he'll have little trouble if any getting this out

The aluminum is not coated on the K bikes. This is why you can use heat on it.
What I find the most efficient is a heat gun. It does provide high heat without any flame.
CF


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Shock absorber stud removal Frog15Shock absorber stud removal Logo2101986 k75, 1985 K100rt, 1985 K100rt/EML GT2 sidecar, 1999 K1200lt/Hannigan Astro Sport sidecar.
    

8Back to top Go down   Shock absorber stud removal Empty Hmmmmm Fri May 03, 2013 9:55 pm

ibjman

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How many posts have we seen here siting that the user painted & clear coated their housings?
Anyway, mine is. But I do see what you mean.
Let's stand by now & see how he does.
Regards, ibj...

    

9Back to top Go down   Shock absorber stud removal Empty Re: Shock absorber stud removal Sat May 04, 2013 5:43 am

MT350Explorer

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Thanks Guys not going to have time to do it this week but will post up result/pic when I have.

SO as we don't know what sort of loctite is on the stud I am proposing:

1. Measure amount of thread sticking out proud of the hosuing and write it down!
2. Double nut, tap with a hammer and try to undo.
2 a. If 2 fails assume there is loctite that needs heat to free it so apply heat to the stud (my bike has OEM black covers so I won't apply to the housing) to melt the loctite and then unwind with nuts/grips.

By the way the studs were £5 including (UK) delivery

Cheers
Dave


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1991 K100 RS 16 valve
    

10Back to top Go down   Shock absorber stud removal Empty Re: Shock absorber stud removal Sat May 04, 2013 10:44 am

MikeP

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Even with coated casings you can apply heat, just not an aggressive flame. A hot-air gun will be fine. It would be nice to avoid heating the stud but that's almost impossible. The point of the heat is that of the two metals, the casing will expand more rapidly than the stud as well as softening any thread-locking compound.

    

11Back to top Go down   Shock absorber stud removal Empty Everyone here is.... Sat May 04, 2013 12:40 pm

ibjman

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MT, Seems as if everyone here (except me) is telling you to heat the housing & not the stud. That's your best option.
I stand humbly corrected (again).........I'll just pull up my panties & go home now. 🇳🇴
Frankly, I can't believe how such a seemingly "simple" comment I made seemed to get so out of control........LOL:D
I think that is just the nature of Forums in general.
If I understand correctly (now).......No one in the history of your machine has ever had to scrub the coatings off due to corrosion and hence put paint in their place. You seem confident that the black coating on your housing is OEM stuff.
As a practical matter I see no sense in splitting hairs here., My opinion is (was) that since the stud is such a small diameter in relation to the massive housing that the difference in heat expansion between the 2 parts between heating 1 vs the other seems irrelevant. If you can get the Loc-tite between the 2 pieces up slightly above 400 degrees F, it will melt sufficiently so the stud will probably almost "spin" right out, no matter where you put the heat.
All in all, it's good that you can get several points of view here, so you have the opportunity to digest all your options.
It's fun too.......there's a whole lot of folks that are waiting with baited breath just to see what happens when the mighty attempt is finally made!
We lucky this isn't Las Vegas or a huge fortune could've been won or lost depending upon the outcome of your adventure with the screw............Shock absorber stud removal 44271

    

12Back to top Go down   Shock absorber stud removal Empty Re: Shock absorber stud removal Mon May 06, 2013 4:44 am

RicK G

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I have removed two original intact studs and neither had any loctite but both were a tight thread. If I applied any heat then it would be to the stud and with a LPG/propane torch to about 350deg F which would melt even red loctite and that temperature would in no way affect the integrity of the stud.


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"Man sacrifices his health in order to make money.
Then he sacrifices money to recuperate his health.
And then he is so anxious about the future that he does not enjoy the present; the result being that he does not live in the present or the future; he lives as if he is never going to die, and then dies having never really lived."   Dalai Lama


Bikes 1998 K1100 LT, 1993 K75 RT, 1996 K75RT, 1986 K75 GS, 1979 Z1300 Kawasaki
    

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