BMW K bikes (Bricks)

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1Back to top Go down   How hard to change bar on a K75S? Empty How hard to change bar on a K75S? Tue Dec 10, 2013 8:11 am

Alheng

Alheng
Gold member
Gold member
I have been looking for a K75C or RT for a while now but have not seen any that were worth what the sellers were asking.  I have however seen a few K75Ss but my old body wont take the leaning forward position for the log rides, hence my question.

How involved is it to change the bars from S to C?  Is it a straight swap or do I have to lengthen any cables or wires?  Does the bike start to look weird with the S fairings and the C bars?

Anyone have a C bar sitting in the shed collecting dust?

    

rawdonball

rawdonball
Gold member
Gold member
Hi Mate,

We have probably been looking at the same K75 S units for sale in WA. Some very good offers in my opinion. The one advertised for $2400 in Dalyellup belongs to a friend of mine. Had it round at my place today to keep the K75C company for a few hours while I did a spline service on the drive shaft for him plus installed a new fuel filter (oh - and changed the brake fluid while I was about it).

This bike is in beautiful condition. Fuel pump mounting was perfect (had the pump out to check the suction filter - all good). Shaft splines still had ample lube plus negligible wear. Hard to believe this is the original shaft as the bike is on 185,000km odd and the UJ was the smoothest I have ever felt (I have only felt three!).

The bike gets 18+ km/litre when ridden at freeway speeds and motor pulls nicely. Rear disc has very little wear at 4.2mm and fronts feel good - was surprised to find them down to 3.65mm and 3.8mm (minimum is 3.5mm - stamped on discs)

Only down side I could find was that the bike has been ridden with a loose gear selector lever. I would have expected just the lever to wear as I assume the shaft is carbon steel. In fact there is a fair bit of damage to the splines on the selector shaft and there was still a little movement when I had cleaned everything up and refitted plus tightened until the gap on the selector lever was closed up. Needs a replacement selector lever at the very least I would think plus no guarantee that this would last. I ended up removing the lever again, cleaning everything with spirit and applying Devcon plastic steel. Wouldn't be surprised if this lasts another 185,000km.

Oh yes - the other negative is that the fuel tank has been successfully repaired on both sides, with plastic putty. I guess these repairs could give problems in the future but the problem of water ingress was traced to fuel cap having been installed the wrong way around - hence drain was de-activated. I only knew to look for this through reading posts on this forum so the investment is paying off.
Much obliged to all.

Back to your original question - I know that Chris at the BM shop in Brisbane does loads of the conversion that you are talking off. Well it sounded like the most common one he does is from the K100RS to a K100 with RT bars and all else staying as is. He charges $600 odd so I imagine the bars plus cables / brake hose would cost us a couple of hundred tops. I would love to help you do the conversion if you wanted a hand because I am super confident that we can find any help if needed on this forum.

Those more knowledgable will hopefully correct me if I am wrong but as far as I can see, the same conversion to the 75S would be very similar if not identical. Others will have a better idea too, of the parts cost.

I do want to own a 75S when I can afford one and anticipate that by the time I hit 60 in 4 or 5 years ???? I will want to do a conversion of sorts.

Let me know if you want me to check out anything in particular on the Dalyellup K75S as this bike resides only 2 to 3 km from my place.

Cheers,

Rawdon


__________________________________________________
'88 K100RT, '86 K75C, '05 Yamaha TTR250
    

MikeP

MikeP
Life time member
Life time member
K75S to C bars only requires a change to the brake master cylinder to top-yoke line if it is a non-ABS bike with the brake line passing through the steering stem. All other control cables will work with C bars.

As for does it look weird, here's an S that I once owned and fitted with C bars.

How hard to change bar on a K75S? K75S%20%28138%29-L

How hard to change bar on a K75S? K75S%20%28139%29-L


__________________________________________________
1992 K1
1993 K1100R (used to be an LT)
    

4Back to top Go down   How hard to change bar on a K75S? Empty Re: How hard to change bar on a K75S? Tue Dec 10, 2013 11:09 pm

Alheng

Alheng
Gold member
Gold member
Thanks Rawdon for the condition report of that K75S, was tempted to ride down to look at it but there have been a few closer to Perth that I have been looking at and a few are pretty decent.

Mike, that sure is one sweet looking ride!  Did the wind dynamics change alot with the new bars?

    

MikeP

MikeP
Life time member
Life time member
Alheng wrote:
Mike, that sure is one sweet looking ride!  Did the wind dynamics change alot with the new bars?

Thanks. That was the "Turd" that I bought sight unseen on ebay, then polished a bit. It sold within 10 minutes of my advertising it (four times over).

No appreciable change to the wind blast as the 75S isn't very good at protection anyway.


__________________________________________________
1992 K1
1993 K1100R (used to be an LT)
    

6Back to top Go down   How hard to change bar on a K75S? Empty how hard to change the bars Sat Dec 21, 2013 2:13 pm

Das Bitchz

Das Bitchz
active member
active member
Easy, I did it in 2.5 hours (taking my time) the longest part is to take everything apart to channel the C type bar extension cable through the frame, It is probably the most comfortable option for bars therefore I didn't like it because it does have a serious impact on the overall original design! this is a question of choice!
When BMW created the K's in the 80's they were slowly loosing sales to the Japanese, so they had to come up with a newer design of machine, Boxer were loosing interest globally....so when the K was designed, they suited the bike with those bars to make it look like aggressive Japanese sport bike...the Bike was still a tourer (Or a GT on 2 wheels) but with sport Bike Bars...in fact, the magazine reviews at the time of it's launch were confused as to where BMW was heading with a tourer Bike with sport feels!

    

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