BMW K bikes (Bricks)

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Arlina

Arlina
Life time member
Life time member
Thanks to the new kind of fuel we have here, and the fact that the bike has been left alone for a year, the problem of too high fuelpressure let my K run like a drunk.
Reading about every interesting topic here, Sidecar Paul mentioned about a regulator in the pump itself.
Took te pump out, and found the bugger.

Now will share my pictures from the inside of the pump;

Inside of a fuelpump and the pressure regulator 10422303_907093835981590_7695738730776580607_n

Inside of a fuelpump and the pressure regulator 10868170_907093815981592_1851297992885741701_n

Inside of a fuelpump and the pressure regulator 10363557_907093809314926_6331671268359959657_n

Inside of a fuelpump and the pressure regulator 1620633_907093875981586_2034533286519270368_n

This is the actual pump without the motor, before you take it apart, mark some things that everything goes exactly back to where it has been before;
Inside of a fuelpump and the pressure regulator 10868041_907093882648252_7697276721139151643_n

Inside of a fuelpump and the pressure regulator 10393911_907093932648247_201622602847478069_n

Here is the regulator from the inside, if it's stuck, push it gently with a soft tool down. I took the cap of a BIC-pen.
Inside of a fuelpump and the pressure regulator 10857742_907093945981579_4960336588973161526_n

Here it is on the outside, if you don't open the pump, and have a small telephone pliers, you can pull the pin in the middle;
Inside of a fuelpump and the pressure regulator 10341621_907093952648245_8221400576829553026_n


Before cleaning;
Inside of a fuelpump and the pressure regulator 10356182_907094015981572_8495716884930320652_n


After cleaning;
Inside of a fuelpump and the pressure regulator 1898041_907094029314904_2620497038413010842_n


Put the pump back together, the O-ring goes in first in the aluminium can, then the pump;
Inside of a fuelpump and the pressure regulator 1898252_907094059314901_8228528487149682610_n




Watch out removing the 2 clips wich hold the motor in place, they are not easy to find when they try to escape, and hard to get in the open world (store) 🤡 
Inside of a fuelpump and the pressure regulator 1512488_907105452647095_224056650729040037_n


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Inside of a fuelpump and the pressure regulator Eu-log10  K1100RS/LT - R1200RT - R1100RS (RIP) - Cagiva SST 350 Ala Verde - K75LT project
    

sidecar paul

sidecar paul
Life time member
Life time member
Nice one Wheeldigger,  good to see the innards revealed..... and great pictures.  Inside of a fuelpump and the pressure regulator 112350

Paul.


__________________________________________________
'84 K100RS (0014643) (owned since '85), 86 K100RS (0018891) with Martello sidecar (built as an outfit in '88),
'51 Vincent (since '67),'72 Montesa Cota (from new), '87 Honda RS125R NF4 (bought 2015) 
....No CARS never ever!
    

Dai

Dai
Life time member
Life time member
A note in passing (which doesn't seem to apply here); if the commutator is covered in grey carbon from the brushes do not polish it. Rub a clean cloth around it to remove any excess. The grey stuff is filling in miniscule pits in the copper and is actually creating a larger contact surface for the brushes.

By all means carefully scrape the dirty stuff from between the copper segments.

Comment also applies to starter motors and alternators.


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'83 K100 upgraded to K100RS spec, '87 K100RT
Others...
'78 Moto Guzzi 850-T3, '79 Moto Guzzi 850-T3 California,'93 Moto Guzzi 1100ie California
    

Comberjohn

Comberjohn
Life time member
Life time member
Not trying to be a killjoy but a few of us have been down this road before when the pump has died.
Can't think of anyone who was successful getting it back together and working again.
But, prepared to be proved wrong! cheers


__________________________________________________
Life is not a rehearsal.
2010 VFR 1200F DCT 
2010 R1200GS(gone)
1986 K100 Silver(gone)
2012 K1600GT(gone)
1984 K100RT Madison Silver(gone)
1989 K100LT Stratus Grey(gone)
1984 K100 Red(gone)
http://www.johnsdrivingschool.co
    

brickrider

brickrider
Life time member
Life time member
I would think that anyone clever and patient enough to strip it to that level would also be able to diagnose any faults and sort the pump out.  I'm not sure I'd be able to do that, but there are an impressive number of talented riders on this forum....

    

Arlina

Arlina
Life time member
Life time member
I did put the pump back together, placed it back, and is running fine.
All problems I had before are gone now.

Little add from Rene;
Rene; Although I appreciate the pictures the info is not correct. The FPR is sufficient to keep the pump pressure at 2.5, even if the bike isn't running (at which time the biggest volume is pumped through the FPR). The relieve valve in the pump opens at a far higher pressure (6 IIRC) and is only there to protect the pump in cases there is a blockage somewhere.



Rene; It might be that for whatever reason the pump safety opened and then didn't really shut or dirt prevented it to open in the first place. Somehow rust accumulates there.


__________________________________________________
Inside of a fuelpump and the pressure regulator Eu-log10  K1100RS/LT - R1200RT - R1100RS (RIP) - Cagiva SST 350 Ala Verde - K75LT project
    

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