BMW K bikes (Bricks)

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DanT56

DanT56
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It's happened. In hindsight, I should have stayed away from that bolt.
I've been going thru my newly acquired 87 K100LT and it's been good so far. While in the processes of changing the fork fluid I found a drain bolt on one fork stripped.
I see there are three options I can try before I ....order a used lower fork section.

I'm going to try a slightly longer bolt before I go with the other two options which is to drill out and install a helical and the other is to drill out the threads on the lower section of the fork and use a tap for the next size bolt and step up in the bolt size and the washer.

I've read that there is a valve in the lower section of the fork that I need to stay away from. Does anyone know what length M6 bolt I should try before going to the other two options? Without looking at the OEM bolt I'm assuming it is a fine thread bolt.


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1987 K100LT
    

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I did the same on my '87 RS so I bought a Helicoil kit and brought it back to OZ with me on one of my visits, rethreaded the hole using the Helicoil spring thread and the stock drain plug screw. Easy fix.

It's 6mm x 1.0

It has never leaked.

If a replacement is needed: BMW part number 
07 11 9 913 408 screw 6x6mm. The crush washer is a 6 x 10 and part number 07 11 9 963 030. You can't go any deeper with a new screw than 6mm, maybe 7mm, or you will make contact with fork internals.


__________________________________________________
“A bike on the road is worth two in the shed.” ~ Anonymous

1970 R60/5, OZ '77 R75/7-R100, '85 K100'87 K75C, OZ '87 K100RS, '93 K11-K12 Big Block, '93 K1100RS, '95 R100-Mystic, '96 K1100RS, '98 K1200RS, '00 K1200RS, '02 K1200RS, '03 K1200GT, '04 R1150R'04 R1150RT, '05 K1200S, '06 K1200R, '07 K1200R, '09 K1300GT & 2013 R1200RT-Polizei  - Beemers owned still or sold.

    

DanT56

DanT56
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I have no experience with helicoils. Is the 6mm x 1.0 in your reply the Helicoil?
If I'm not mistaken, I would need to do some drilling to install the Helicoil right and should the helicoil be stainless steel?


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1987 K100LT
    

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@DanT56 wrote:I have no experience with helicoils. Is the 6mm x 1.0 in your reply the Helicoil?
If I'm not mistaken, I would need to do some drilling to install the Helicoil right and should the helicoil be stainless steel?
Stripped M6 drain bolt on '87 K100LT lower fork Helico10
6 in millimetres, 1.0 in thread pitch. It's not fine but standard pitch for a 6mm screw. The above image is a typical Helicoil kit. You drill out the damaged threads in the fork leg. You re-thread the enlarged hole with the provided tool. You screw the spring-steel threads into the newly enlarged hole with the provided tool. In some cases you snap off a tiny end bit of the new threads, then re-insert your original - undamaged - screw with a new crush washer. Voila!

If strength is a concern, years ago I was with an old time mechanic after hours at work and worried about him using Helicoil inserts in my recently freshened, dual-plugged cylinder heads in the now stripped out spark plug holes. I wanted them welded up and re-threaded. He turned to me and asked if I'd ever studied a helicopter's aluminium frame. I hadn't. He stated that every screw holding on a part in the main frame is inserted into a Helicoil-like device. I nodded in agreement. He performed the task. Those four spark plug thread inserts are still functioning two decades later.


__________________________________________________
“A bike on the road is worth two in the shed.” ~ Anonymous

1970 R60/5, OZ '77 R75/7-R100, '85 K100'87 K75C, OZ '87 K100RS, '93 K11-K12 Big Block, '93 K1100RS, '95 R100-Mystic, '96 K1100RS, '98 K1200RS, '00 K1200RS, '02 K1200RS, '03 K1200GT, '04 R1150R'04 R1150RT, '05 K1200S, '06 K1200R, '07 K1200R, '09 K1300GT & 2013 R1200RT-Polizei  - Beemers owned still or sold.

    

5Back to top Go down   Stripped M6 drain bolt on '87 K100LT lower fork Empty awesome-thanks on Sun Jan 03, 2021 12:11 pm

DanT56

DanT56
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This is excellent and unexpected. Thank you.
Now I feel like I can tackle this and hopefully have success doing it.


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1987 K100LT
    

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Two Wheels Better
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@DanT56 wrote:This is excellent and unexpected. Thank you.
Now I feel like I can tackle this and hopefully have success doing it.
Yeah, it's a straightforward procedure. The Helicoil kit will inform you of what size drill bit to use. I did not remove the fork leg. I did it in situ, and used wheel bearing grease on the tip of the bit to capture any stray aluminium particles. I was wanting to do a regularly scheduled fork fluid change so did that upon completion of the thread repair.

Look around a bit as Helicoil kits are not inexpensive, tho' cheaper than the alternative of locating a good, used fork slider, which itself may have compromised threads or other issue.

Good luck.


__________________________________________________
“A bike on the road is worth two in the shed.” ~ Anonymous

1970 R60/5, OZ '77 R75/7-R100, '85 K100'87 K75C, OZ '87 K100RS, '93 K11-K12 Big Block, '93 K1100RS, '95 R100-Mystic, '96 K1100RS, '98 K1200RS, '00 K1200RS, '02 K1200RS, '03 K1200GT, '04 R1150R'04 R1150RT, '05 K1200S, '06 K1200R, '07 K1200R, '09 K1300GT & 2013 R1200RT-Polizei  - Beemers owned still or sold.

    

Dai

Dai
Life time member
Life time member
You'll need a 6.2mm driil. Better buy a kit complete with the drill, tap, driver, snap tool and helicoils. Example:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/BRAND-NEW-6mm-Helicoil-Type-Thread-Repair-UK-Seller-Freepost/274600538112?hash=item3fef77b000:g:G0UAAOSwIqlfyfHJ

You will also need a tap wrench if you don't have one. Example:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/FACOM-Professional-RATCHETING-T-HANDLED-TAP-WRENCH-For-Taps-up-to-6mm-830A-5/131312899794?epid=1445860910&hash=item1e92dbd6d2:g:OGEAAMXQxzZRcd4T

Having a set in the wokshop is a damn good idea because I can (almost) guarantee that the fuel rail threads will strip at some point. Low Flying Brick has around a half-a-dozen helicoils holding the cam cover on, plus both fuel rail mounts. It's an easy enough job if you follow the instructions. When drilling out the remains of the old threads, let the drill lead itself in and it should go in parallel to the hole. Most importantly make sure that the tap goes in exactly perpendicular to the hole.


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1983 K100 upgraded to K100RS spec, 1987 K100RT
Others...
1978 Moto Guzzi 850-T3, 1979 Moto Guzzi 850-T3 California,1993 Moto Guzzi 1100ie California
2020 Royal Enfield Bullet 500
    

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Two Wheels Better
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@Dai wrote:You'll need a 6.2mm driil. Better buy a kit complete with the drill, tap, driver, snap tool and helicoils. Example:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/BRAND-NEW-6mm-Helicoil-Type-Thread-Repair-UK-Seller-Freepost/274600538112?hash=item3fef77b000:g:G0UAAOSwIqlfyfHJ

You will also need a tap wrench if you don't have one. Example:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/FACOM-Professional-RATCHETING-T-HANDLED-TAP-WRENCH-For-Taps-up-to-6mm-830A-5/131312899794?epid=1445860910&hash=item1e92dbd6d2:g:OGEAAMXQxzZRcd4T

Having a set in the workshop is a damn good idea because I can (almost) guarantee that the fuel rail threads will strip at some point. Low Flying Brick has around a half-a-dozen Helicoils holding the cam cover on, plus both fuel rail mounts. It's an easy enough job if you follow the instructions. When drilling out the remains of the old threads, let the drill lead itself in and it should go in parallel to the hole. Most importantly make sure that the tap goes in exactly perpendicular to the hole.
As he's in America Land where metric is still almost frowned upon as spawn of Satan and socialist (I kid, I'm a kidder), he'll find that a 1/4" bit does the job for 6mm re-thread jobs since a 6.2mm bit will be hard to find. Also, that square-section top tip of the threading tool is common enough for household hardware tools bit holders to fit. If doing a lot more Helicoil repairs the proper tools, as Dai has shown, are highly recommended.


__________________________________________________
“A bike on the road is worth two in the shed.” ~ Anonymous

1970 R60/5, OZ '77 R75/7-R100, '85 K100'87 K75C, OZ '87 K100RS, '93 K11-K12 Big Block, '93 K1100RS, '95 R100-Mystic, '96 K1100RS, '98 K1200RS, '00 K1200RS, '02 K1200RS, '03 K1200GT, '04 R1150R'04 R1150RT, '05 K1200S, '06 K1200R, '07 K1200R, '09 K1300GT & 2013 R1200RT-Polizei  - Beemers owned still or sold.

    

Point-Seven-five

Point-Seven-five
Life time member
Life time member
Also, to do a proper threading job on a blind hole or in a place where there is an obstruction behind the hole like a damping valve, a set of taps including a "bottom" tap is necessary to cut threads all the way to the bottom of the hole.  The better sets will have three in them.  A "starter", "intermediate", and "bottom" taps.  It's not a bad idea to search out a set whenever you need to tap a hole.

The starter has a long lead that helps get the tap straight in the hole, the intermediate cuts the threads into the hole and the bottom tap carries the threads all the way to the bottom, just as it's name implies.  Each one does an important part in getting the hole tapped properly.

These are important, for example, when tapping for a cylinder head bolt that requires thread engagement all the way to the bottom of it's hole in order to hold the torque on it.


__________________________________________________
Present:
1994 K75RT
1991 K100RS
1988 K100RS SE

Past:
1994 BMW K75S
1992 BMW K100RS
1982 Honda FT500
1979 Honda XR185
1977 Honda XL125
1974 Honda XL125
1972 OSSA Pioneer 250
1968 Kawasaki 175
    

DanT56

DanT56
active member
active member
Thanks for all the info and pointers on the helicoil and the proper way to drill for them. 

I may have lucked out this afternoon by getting the next size M6 bolt and cutting a slight bit off the end of the bolt. I placed a new M6 washer and some lock-tight on the bolt and was able to get it good and snug using a 10mm wrench. I didn't bother with the torque wrench but feel it wont give me a trouble. I'll know tomorrow how good it is when I but some fork fluid in it.

I'm also going to get one of those helicoil kits as a back up and it sounds like I may need it in the future.


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1987 K100LT
    

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